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Bayly uses satire for performing culture in his new novel



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Miami, November 10 (EFE) .- Peruvian author Jaime Bayly reveals in a key to deceive the meaning given in Latin American countries for the occurrence of "own reality" in his new novel, "Cold Chest", which will present this Sunday in the book's international fair of Miami.

"As caricatures that the plot seems, I insist that fiction lacks reality," said in an interview with the Efe author.

His most humorous novel and even the longest of his personal biography, "Pecho Frío", is a kind of "opera bufa" full of "disproportionate characters", starting with the gray bank counter who directs the story and gives its name to fiction as one day accepts to kiss with a TV presenter in exchange for a price.

Photography is borrowed today, Saturday November 10, 2018, by Vintage Español, where Peruvian author Jaime Bayly is displayed. Bayly reveals in a key key the meaning of Latin American countries to actors rather than the "reality" of his new novel, "Pecho Frío", which will be featured this Sunday at the International Book Fair in Miami. "As caricatures that the plot seems, I insist that fiction lacks reality," said in an interview with the Efe author. His most humorous novel and even the longest of his personal biography, "Pecho Frío", is a kind of "opera bufa" full of "disproportionate characters", starting with the gray bank counter who directs the story and gives its name to fiction as one day accepts to kiss with a TV presenter in exchange for a price. EFE

"He will change his life in a very seismic way," said the Peruvian man about the kiss Pecho Frío accepts from Mama Huevos before the television cameras, to scandal his wife Culo Fino and that he will eventually host the separation , termination of his work while becoming an icon for the gay movement, which entitles him even when he is not gay.

That's why the book, the seventeenth it publishes, is also a reflection of how the "unexpected fame" can destroy a calm life and "question" who you are, who happens to the main character who end up in politics.

"Fame disappears your identity," says the author, journalist and television presenter, based in Miami, who has devoted himself to the small screen for more than 30 years, but in his case, it was his own choice for 18 years from anonymity.

The novel even allows its own reference when the famous interviewer Niño Terrible talks about becoming a president in Peru, an idea that Bayly in some ways weighs and even today confesses is a kind of "ghost" who has "well caged".

"Politics in Peru is almost a police case. Almost everyone stops detainees or refugees, that's a scary thing. I did not mind running for the presidency," said the author of the attempt to "born like a joke" in the last decade and today it is thankful not to be out because it would have meant losing personal freedom.

"I'm a writer, if you get into politics, you're destroying the literary career, and I think Peru's politics is a broom, there's no way you get out of the way," Dike said.

However, in his television program in Miami, Latin America's policy is not absent, especially with regard to the "dictatorship of Venezuela", which has earned him a threat and even a suspected car collision from which he fled undamaged. of criticism disturbed almost every day against the "Nicolás Maduro dictatorship".

He has come to fear, he acknowledges, but he estimates that "fear is always a good sign," as it indicates that "you are doing worthy."

Before a hostess, or "a Fujimorist", that is, a follower of Peruvian opposition leader Keiko Fujimori, Bayly confirms that he is a "libertarian" as former US elections voted for the candidate of this party, Gary Johnson, and not by the current president , Donald Trump, or by Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

"I think religion and the military have made unclear damage to Peru," he said after declaring an agnostic and against the "churches that the state subsidized".

He is still faithful, at least to the literature and his writer, like Javier Marías ("I do not see another prose in Spanish as high and rich as his"), his compatriot Mario Vargas Llosa, Charles Bukowski, who used his life to create art, "but show your most miserable side", and Roberto Bolaño, who was a friend who prefers his short stories.

Interrogated on his first novels, including the successful "Do not Tell Anybody" (1994) and "The Last Days of the Press" (1996), of which recent pressures have been made, he was grateful to "aging more or less well" since its publication and the young readers read "curiosity".

"The hustle and bustle of art is to stand on time," he says.


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