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Home / canada / Woman sues NHS for not telling her that she had inherited Huntington's disease gene from father

Woman sues NHS for not telling her that she had inherited Huntington's disease gene from father



Mother sues NHS for not telling her she had inherited Huntingdon's disease gene from father who shot her mother dead – and says she wouldn't have had a child if she had known

  • The woman, known as ABC, was pregnant at her father's diagnosis
  • Her father made it clear that he did not want his daughter to be informed
  • She claims that St. George & # 39; s NHS Trust had a duty of care to tell about the diagnosis
  • ABC's daughter will have a 50:50 chance of inheriting the disease

A woman is suing an NHS trust in London for not telling her that her father, who had shot his mother dead, had been diagnosed with Huntington's disease.

The woman, known as ABC, claims that St. George's NHS Trust owed her a duty of care to tell her father's diagnosis, given that doctors there knew she was pregnant.

She discovered that he carried the gene for the degenerative, incurable brain disorder only after her daughter was born and that she also carried the wrong gene, which means her child has a 50:50 chance of inheriting it.

The woman, known as ABC, claims that St. George's NHS Trust owed her a duty of care to tell her father's diagnosis, given that doctors there knew she was pregnant

The woman, known as ABC, claims that St. George's NHS Trust owed her a duty of care to tell her father's diagnosis, given that doctors there knew she was pregnant

ABC said she would not have gone through the pregnancy if she had known about it.

Her father was diagnosed with the condition in 2009 by a doctor at St George's NHS Trust, he then made it clear that he did not want his daughter to get information. She had told him she was pregnant. He told doctors he feared she could kill herself or have an abortion, according to the BBC.

What is Huntington's Disease?

Huntington's disease is a condition that prevents parts of the brain from functioning properly over time. It is passed on (inherited) from a person's parents.

It gradually gets worse over time and is usually fatal after a period of up to 20 years.

The symptoms usually start at the age of 30 to 50 years, but can start much sooner or later.

Symptoms of Huntington's disease may include: concentration difficulties and memory loss; Depression; stumbling and clumsy; involuntary twitching or severe movements of the limbs and body; mood swings and personality changes; problems swallowing, talking and breathing; difficulty moving.

Full-time health care is needed in the later stages of the condition. It is usually fatal about 15 to 20 years after symptoms begin.

Huntington's disease is caused by a faulty gene that results in parts of the brain gradually becoming damaged over time.

You usually only risk developing it if one of your parents has or had it. Both men and women can get it.

If a parent has Huntington's disease gene, there is one:

1 in 2 (50%) chance that each of their children develops the condition – affected children can also transmit the gene to any child they have

Very often, it is possible to develop Huntington's disease without having a history of it in your family. But this is usually just because one of your parents was never diagnosed with it.

There is currently no cure for Huntington's disease or any way to prevent it from getting worse.

But treatment and support can help reduce some of the problems it causes.

Source: NHS

In 2007, ABC's father had shot and killed his mother.

He was convicted of murder for diminished responsibility and arrested under the Mental Health Act.

At that time, he suspected that he may have been affected by Huntington's disease, a fatal neurological condition.

Symptoms of the disease may include: mood swings and personality changes, concentration difficulties and memory loss; Depression; stumbling and clumsy; involuntary twitching or severe movements of the limbs and body; problems swallowing, talking and breathing; difficulty moving.

Four months after her daughter, now 9, was born, ABC was accidentally informed of her father's condition.

She was tested and found that she had inherited the Huntington's gene. The symptoms usually start at the age of 30 to 50 years, but can start much sooner or later.

Her daughter has not yet been tested, but she has a 50 percent chance of carrying the gene.

ABC told the BBC that she would have done a genetic test and ended the pregnancy rather than risk having a child who had inherited the disease and could have to look after a seriously ill parent.

Disclosure of personal information, without the patient's consent, may be justified in preventing others from being exposed to a risk of death or serious injury.

At that time, ABC and her father reportedly had family therapy organized by the NHS. ABC has argued that there was an obligation to protect her psychological or physical well-being.

This is a cornerstone of the doctor / patient relationship, but it is not absolute.

If ABC wins its case, it would trigger a major change in the patient's confidentiality rules and ask questions about the potential duty of care that family members owe after genetic testing.

ABC's case was first argued before the Supreme Court as early as 2015 when a judge ruled that a full hearing would not proceed.

The verdict said there was "no reasonably disputable duty of care" that ABC owes.

In 2017, however, the appeals court reversed the decision and said that the case should be tried.

ABC's case was first argued before the Supreme Court as early as 2015 when a judge ruled that a full hearing would not proceed. The verdict said there was "no reasonably disputable duty of care" that ABC owes. In 2017, however, the appeals court reversed the decision and said that the case should be tried

A spokesman for St George & # 39; s Healthcare NHS Trust said: "This case raises complex and sensitive issues regarding the competing interests between the duty of care and the duty of confidentiality.

"It will be for the court to decide these issues during the trial."


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Home / canada / Woman sues NHS for not telling her that she had inherited Huntington's disease gene from father

Woman sues NHS for not telling her that she had inherited Huntington's disease gene from father



Mother sues NHS for not telling her she had inherited Huntingdon's disease gene from father who shot her mother dead – and says she wouldn't have had a child if she had known

  • The woman, known as ABC, was pregnant at her father's diagnosis
  • Her father made it clear that he did not want his daughter to be informed
  • She claims that St. George & # 39; s NHS Trust had a duty of care to tell about the diagnosis
  • ABC's daughter will have a 50:50 chance of inheriting the disease

A woman is suing an NHS trust in London for not telling her that her father, who had shot his mother dead, had been diagnosed with Huntington's disease.

The woman, known as ABC, claims that St. George's NHS Trust owed her a duty of care to tell her father's diagnosis, given that doctors there knew she was pregnant.

She discovered that he carried the gene for the degenerative, incurable brain disorder only after her daughter was born and that she also carried the wrong gene, which means her child has a 50:50 chance of inheriting it.

The woman, known as ABC, claims that St. George's NHS Trust owed her a duty of care to tell her father's diagnosis, given that doctors there knew she was pregnant

The woman, known as ABC, claims that St. George's NHS Trust owed her a duty of care to tell her father's diagnosis, given that doctors there knew she was pregnant

ABC said she would not have gone through the pregnancy if she had known about it.

Her father was diagnosed with the condition in 2009 by a doctor at St George's NHS Trust, he then made it clear that he did not want his daughter to get information. She had told him she was pregnant. He told doctors he feared she could kill herself or have an abortion, according to the BBC.

What is Huntington's Disease?

Huntington's disease is a condition that prevents parts of the brain from functioning properly over time. It is passed on (inherited) from a person's parents.

It gradually gets worse over time and is usually fatal after a period of up to 20 years.

The symptoms usually start at the age of 30 to 50 years, but can start much sooner or later.

Symptoms of Huntington's disease may include: concentration difficulties and memory loss; Depression; stumbling and clumsy; involuntary twitching or severe movements of the limbs and body; mood swings and personality changes; problems swallowing, talking and breathing; difficulty moving.

Full-time health care is needed in the later stages of the condition. It is usually fatal about 15 to 20 years after symptoms begin.

Huntington's disease is caused by a faulty gene that results in parts of the brain gradually becoming damaged over time.

You usually only risk developing it if one of your parents has or had it. Both men and women can get it.

If a parent has Huntington's disease gene, there is one:

1 in 2 (50%) chance that each of their children develops the condition – affected children can also transmit the gene to any child they have

Very often, it is possible to develop Huntington's disease without having a history of it in your family. But this is usually just because one of your parents was never diagnosed with it.

There is currently no cure for Huntington's disease or any way to prevent it from getting worse.

But treatment and support can help reduce some of the problems it causes.

Source: NHS

In 2007, ABC's father had shot and killed his mother.

He was convicted of murder for diminished responsibility and arrested under the Mental Health Act.

At that time, he suspected that he may have been affected by Huntington's disease, a fatal neurological condition.

Symptoms of the disease may include: mood swings and personality changes, concentration difficulties and memory loss; Depression; stumbling and clumsy; involuntary twitching or severe movements of the limbs and body; problems swallowing, talking and breathing; difficulty moving.

Four months after her daughter, now 9, was born, ABC was accidentally informed of her father's condition.

She was tested and found that she had inherited the Huntington's gene. The symptoms usually start at the age of 30 to 50 years, but can start much sooner or later.

Her daughter has not yet been tested, but she has a 50 percent chance of carrying the gene.

ABC told the BBC that she would have done a genetic test and ended the pregnancy rather than risk having a child who had inherited the disease and could have to look after a seriously ill parent.

Disclosure of personal information, without the patient's consent, may be justified in preventing others from being exposed to a risk of death or serious injury.

At that time, ABC and her father reportedly had family therapy organized by the NHS. ABC has argued that there was an obligation to protect her psychological or physical well-being.

This is a cornerstone of the doctor / patient relationship, but it is not absolute.

If ABC wins its case, it would trigger a major change in the patient's confidentiality rules and ask questions about the potential duty of care that family members owe after genetic testing.

ABC's case was first argued before the Supreme Court as early as 2015 when a judge ruled that a full hearing would not proceed.

The verdict said there was "no reasonably disputable duty of care" that ABC owes.

In 2017, however, the appeals court reversed the decision and said that the case should be tried.

ABC's case was first argued before the Supreme Court as early as 2015 when a judge ruled that a full hearing would not proceed. The verdict said there was "no reasonably disputable duty of care" that ABC owes. In 2017, however, the appeals court reversed the decision and said that the case should be tried

A spokesman for St George & # 39; s Healthcare NHS Trust said: "This case raises complex and sensitive issues regarding the competing interests between the duty of care and the duty of confidentiality.

"It will be for the court to decide these issues during the trial."


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