Wednesday , September 28 2022

Lego is swallowed by 6 Melbourne physicians to test how long it takes to pass



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All parents know that you can not spend every second and look at your little ones. Therefore, they are good at putting on all inedible things in the mouth.

Although things like button batteries and rubber balls are filled with immediate danger – some other little toys will only go through natural by swallowee (yah, I've just made a word …)

And one of the great sins are the bazillion pieces in Lego that spread around the house – because we are honest, we either stand forever on the teenybits, while they are in pain and desperately try not to swear – or our darling children consume them when they Feels the unexplained need.

But it's always a mystery for how long the random object is left in your baby's stomach.

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At least one of two Lego men seemed worried about the test. Image: iStock

Was there a need for fecal fossicking?

Well, do not wonder more – like six University of Melbourne researchers (who must have had a few days!) Have tested Herald Sunreports.

The dedicated researchers found that a Lego-man's head is likely to pass in 1-3 days on his own, without complications, and without the need for faecal fossicking.

Head researcher Dr Andrew Tagg wrote in the Journal of Pediatrics and Child Health that it would be likely that toy parts would pass more quickly through a child's more untidy bowel than the average 1.7 days it took for adults in their study.

"This will be beneficial for affluent parents"

A doctor could not find the lego head intact despite looking for two weeks.

"This will be useful for afraid parents who may worry that transit times may be long-term and potentially painful for their children," wrote Dr Tagg.

"If an experienced clinician with a PhD student can not find items in his own pallet, it is clear that we should not expect parents to do that."

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